Mead alcohol content – Ring Of Fire Meadery http://ringoffiremeadery.com/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 18:23:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ringoffiremeadery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Mead alcohol content – Ring Of Fire Meadery http://ringoffiremeadery.com/ 32 32 Siena drink program extends alcohol consumption after keg parties https://ringoffiremeadery.com/siena-drink-program-extends-alcohol-consumption-after-keg-parties/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 14:04:40 +0000 https://ringoffiremeadery.com/siena-drink-program-extends-alcohol-consumption-after-keg-parties/ For many, drinking in college meant keg parties, Long Island iced teas, and cheap pitchers of beer with friends at the local bar. For some students at Siena College in Loudonville, drinking in college means oak-paneled lounges and fine liquors to be enjoyed while stretching their research muscles. The new Siena College Beverage Institute, founded […]]]>

For many, drinking in college meant keg parties, Long Island iced teas, and cheap pitchers of beer with friends at the local bar. For some students at Siena College in Loudonville, drinking in college means oak-paneled lounges and fine liquors to be enjoyed while stretching their research muscles.

The new Siena College Beverage Institute, founded this spring by a group of faculty and staff, grew out of bi-weekly Zoom meetings within the group to have drinks together, explore new minds, and discuss various work and research projects. that each one undertook. during the COVID-19 pandemic. The community and friendliness that was offered in these virtual meetings, while having the opportunity to share their work and gather ideas on how to solve problems and gather new ideas, has been so beneficial to them. participants that some of the group asked themselves: benefit our students from Siena?

“I lived for (the Zoom meetings) during COVID. It was the highlight of my second week, ”said Krysta Dennis, creative arts producer at Siena College and one of the founders of the Beverage Institute. She teamed up with Daniel Moriarty, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, to create the backbone of the program and figure out how to make it work with student participation. As part of the Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity, Moriarty put forward the idea that students not only come together to form a community around local drinks, but also combine research projects specific to the local community of production of beverages as a whole to acquire experiential education.

“At its root, (the Siena College Beverage Institute) is a research project. It could be water testing for a local producer, it could be designing a label for a brand, ”Moriarty said. The duo included in the program Jodi O’Donnell, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry in Siena, as well as Father Tito Serrano, member of the convent of Siena. (“We call him our Spiritual Advisor,” Dennis said.) To complement the research and project management opportunities that students in the program could explore, Dennis pointed out to Michael Lounello, from the technology and video production department. of Siena, to join the Institute and expand its potential.

“It all happened so naturally, it’s scary,” said Lounello of the Institute’s formation. The first cohort of students was launched this summer, with each student finding a project in their field of study to relate to a need in the local beverage production market. As a group, the Institute worked with the Capital Craft Beverage Trail Passport Program to ensure marketing and content development. Other services offered by students include business planning and financial analysis, chemical analysis, and regulatory assistance. Unlike other beverage-focused college programs, the goal of Siena College Beverage Institute is to serve more of a collaborative consultancy rather than a pool of interns, providing students with hands-on experience related to their majors that can be applied to resumes and job searches. -graduation.

“One of the very appealing aspects of the program is that it is producer-centric. Students have specific items that they can perform on, ”said John Curtin, founder of Albany Distilling Co. and member of the beverage circuit. “It’s unique in that it addresses the larger picture of the craft beverage industry, not just production,” he added. Although the Institute is only a few months old, Curtin and other producers (seven companies, to date) have benefited from the work of the Institute’s students.

Finding solutions in their projects with peers and teachers often happens during a wine, cider, beer and spirits tasting. “The greatest ‘aha’ moments happen over a drink,” said Lounello, and he found this to be true among Institute students and with his colleagues. The program received favorable recognition from the school, and community leaders, notable alumni, school deans and Siena President Chris Gibson all came to participate in the tasting and discussions. .

“We teach students to drink less and better. They learn this valuable skill on how to conduct themselves in a professional setting, ”said Moriarty. “I don’t know if that was our goal when we started, but it absolutely is now,” he added.
Moriarty also said that the American university environment lacks the pub culture that is present in European and Asian universities, where lessons and classroom conversations extend into the bar room.

Dennis, a certified sommelier, said the program “creates well-rounded students” who develop good life skills and critical thinking skills, but also increase their appreciation for the finer things in life, like a good glass of wine. . “We have fantastic noses in this house,” said Dennis. “The culture that develops here is important and nothing makes me happier than hearing students from the other room talk about the exciting wines they are going to drink. “

Siena College Beverage Institute is located in Serra Manor, a stately brick house that was previously only used for a few upstairs offices. The expansive kitchen and elegant library (affectionately known as the “Whiskey Room”) lend the cultured atmosphere the Institute nurtures among students. In the basement, a pre-existing wine cellar serves as proof of the Institute’s membership in Serra Manor. Moriarty said students in the program frequently crowded into the whiskey room to talk about their studies and share tasting notes around a new bottle of liquor. These conversations continue through field trips to local beverage producers or to campus projects attached to the Institute, such as a mead-making project with Serrano in the college chapel.

While alcohol is the unifying theme of the Siena Beverage Institute, “it’s not the Siena College Drinking Club,” Lounello said. Use craft drinks as a way for students to express ideas and gain an internship that can translate into their potential future in the job market. (Lounello said that this experience helps Siena graduates to create “jobs that don’t yet exist.”)


“It’s like everything we’ve done here, there should have been a roadblock, but there wasn’t,” Lounello said. Just as a glass of silky sherry glides effortlessly down the esophagus, the Siena Beverage Institute is pleasant, contemplative, and welcomed by many.


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California turbo-charges push for COVID-19 booster injections | PA https://ringoffiremeadery.com/california-turbo-charges-push-for-covid-19-booster-injections-pa/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 14:59:45 +0000 https://ringoffiremeadery.com/california-turbo-charges-push-for-covid-19-booster-injections-pa/ LOS ANGELES – Amid growing concerns over a possible increase in the coronavirus in winter, health officials in California and other areas are stepping up the push for COVID-19 booster injections in hopes of delivering more adults the additional dose as soon as possible. The move comes amid low initial demand for booster shots, which […]]]>

LOS ANGELES – Amid growing concerns over a possible increase in the coronavirus in winter, health officials in California and other areas are stepping up the push for COVID-19 booster injections in hopes of delivering more adults the additional dose as soon as possible.

The move comes amid low initial demand for booster shots, which has raised fears that more people who received their first vaccines almost a year ago will see their immunity weakened further during the pivotal period of recalls. vacation. In California, only 34% of people aged 65 and over who were fully vaccinated were boosted, as were only 14% of adults who were fully vaccinated.

Federal guidelines say any adult can be recalled if they are at increased risk of exposure to COVID-19 because of where they work or live.

National and local health authorities are urging the public as well as pharmacies, medical centers and other vaccine distributors to take a liberal view on this matter – meaning all adults are eligible as long as two months have passed since they received a Johnson & Johnson injection, or at least six months have passed since they received a second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna.

Traditionally, the “increased risk” criteria outlined by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been applied to those who work in places such as hospitals, schools, grocery stores, or factories – or to those who work in places such as hospitals, schools, grocery stores, or factories. live in gathering places like prisons or homeless shelters.

But the wording of the recently published criteria is broad, and some health officials, including in California, are now increasingly pointing out that it can be interpreted in a much broader way.

Dr Tomás Aragón, head of public health and director of the California Department of Public Health, sent a letter on Tuesday asking vaccine suppliers to “allow patients to self-determine their risk of exposure.” Do not refuse a patient who requests a callback.

Adults eligible for the recall may include those who “live in geographic areas that have been heavily affected by COVID,” those who “live in high transmission areas,” “who work with the public or live with someone who works with the public, ”or“ live or work with someone at high risk of severe impact from COVID, ”Aragón wrote.

There may also be “other risky conditions assessed by the individual,” he added.

The California Department of Public Health on Wednesday summed up its recall guidelines as follows: “In broad terms that anyone can understand, we urge Californians to get a recall if anyone in their home has a health problem or condition. ‘they work with other people. “

The list of qualifying medical conditions itself is long, including overweight, pregnancy, current or former smoker, or high blood pressure, diabetes, asthma, depression, or a drug use disorder. alcohol or drugs.

Based on all of these reasons, “almost everyone is eligible,” said Dr. Sara Cody, health official and director of public health for Santa Clara County, northern California’s most populous county. . “We really encourage everyone to go out and get their booster shot. “

Officials have regularly beaten the drums for the boosters in recent weeks, saying it’s important for eligible people to take advantage of the extra protection ahead of the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, which fueled the worst wave of COVID last year. -19 to date.

Governor Gavin Newsom this week called the potential winter COVID-19 outbreak “the greatest anxiety.”

“While we have been spared the worst this summer, the prospects of a difficult winter are upon us,” he said Wednesday at a press conference promoting the booster shots in Los Angeles. “And that is why we are doing everything in our power to prepare and protect ourselves.”

While California relies on an interpretation of the CDC’s recall guidelines to essentially open the doors, federal officials, for their part, are already weighing the advisability of formally expanding eligibility.

Just this week, Pfizer and BioNTech asked the United States Food and Drug Administration to allow recalls of their COVID-19 vaccine for anyone 18 years of age or older. The results of a new study found that a booster dose resulted in a 95% relative effectiveness of the vaccine compared to people who did not receive a booster.

The California messages mark a change from just a few weeks ago, when authorities generally placed more emphasis on urging the elderly and those with weakened immune systems to get the booster.

This was in part based on official CDC recommendations that – for people vaccinated with Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna – the groups who should receive the booster shots include people aged 65 and over, adults aged 50 and over. more with certain underlying conditions and adults who live in long term care facilities. The CDC also recommended that all adult recipients of J&J be given a booster.

The CDC has also made the boosters available to other specified groups, but has not officially recommended that they take advantage of the extra hit. This included young adults with an underlying disease, as well as people between the ages of 18 and 64 who live or work in environments that put them at increased risk.

As the CDC guidelines note, however, this risk “can vary by settings and be affected by the amount of COVID-19 spreading in a community.”

In Colorado, for example, authorities have taken the position that, given the extent of coronavirus transmission statewide, all adults are eligible for a booster.

“Because COVID-19 is spreading rapidly throughout the state, Colorado is a high-risk place to live and work. Anyone 18 or older who wants a booster and needs to have one should make a plan to get one, ”the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment said on its website.

California’s message is similar. Without a reminder, health officials warn, those vaccinated will be at greater risk of infectious infections, which can lead to hospitalizations and death among the most vulnerable.

“If you think you will benefit from a recall, I encourage you to come out and do it,” said Dr. Mark Ghaly, secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency, in a briefing Wednesday.

He added, “It’s not too late to get it this week. Get that extra protection for Thanksgiving gatherings you may attend. Of course, before the other winter holidays, it is important.

More than 3.7 million Californians have received a recall so far, according to the State Department of Public Health. By comparison, about 25 million people are said to be fully immunized statewide.

The group of boosted Californians includes Daniel Loyd, 60, who said he received his recall as soon as he could.

Outside a CVS in Agoura Hills on Thursday, Loyd said he was not only concerned about his own risk factors, he has diabetes, but also tries to protect those around him – including his wife, who suffers from asthma, and their neighbors retired. community where they live.

Greg Mead of Woodland Hills, meanwhile, said he would not get a callback. He said he was fully vaccinated with J&J and felt unwell for three days afterward.

“I’m done with the shooting,” he said.

It is not uncommon for people who receive a booster to have a mild fever, or perhaps chills or fatigue; it usually lasts 24 hours.

“But everything is going. And it’s much more important for people to just endure this day of side effects because they are protected for a long time, ”said Dr. Marty Fenstersheib, Vaccine Manager for Santa Clara County.

Californians who have not been vaccinated are still about seven times more likely to contract a coronavirus infection than those who have been previously vaccinated. But Ghaly said the state is seeing more cases of the coronavirus among those who got vaccinated earlier.

“We are concerned about what this means for hospitalizations and the strain on our health care delivery system, but ultimately for your safety and protection,” he said. “So now is the best time to consider taking this photo. “

This is especially important, according to health officials, as California’s emergence of the latest Delta wave appears to have come to a halt. The number of newly confirmed coronavirus cases has leveled off in recent weeks – and hospitalizations for COVID-19 statewide have been relatively stable since mid-October.

Nationwide, daily new cases of coronavirus are starting to increase – up 5% over the past week.

Studies have shown that all three COVID-19 vaccines have lost some of their protective power, and data from Israel indicates that booster shots reduce the risk of serious illness and death.

Recently, Dr.Anthony Fauci, the US government’s foremost infectious disease expert, cited a study published in the journal Lancet which found that, compared to people in Israel who received two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, the people who received a third dose had a 93% reduced risk of COVID-related hospitalization, a 92% reduced risk of serious illness, and an 81% reduced risk of COVID-related death.

A report released by the CDC in September showed that the vaccine’s effectiveness against hospitalizations increased from 91% to 77% for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine four months after receiving the second dose. The data available for the J&J vaccine showed that the effectiveness of the vaccine against hospitalization more than 28 days after receiving the single dose was 68%.

But while boosters are an increasingly important part of the fight against the pandemic, health officials say getting more people vaccinated to start is even more critical.

Nearly 70% of Californians have already received at least one dose, and about 63% are fully vaccinated, according to data compiled by The Times. However, those numbers remain well below what health officials believe are necessary to bring the pandemic to its knees.

“We are concerned about winter. We are concerned about the increase in the number of cases, the pressure placed on our hospitals by a number of other issues besides COVID, ”Ghaly said. “So do what you can today to get the vaccine. Protect yourself during the winter.


© 2021 Los Angeles Times. Visit to latimes.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


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If the monkeys ferment, why not you? https://ringoffiremeadery.com/if-the-monkeys-ferment-why-not-you/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 16:05:05 +0000 https://ringoffiremeadery.com/if-the-monkeys-ferment-why-not-you/ Analysis: Humans and Our Non-Human Ancestors Have Eat and Evolved Alongside Fermented Foods for a Long Time Through John leech, Thégasc How old is the art of fermentation and why should you be doing it too? The Egyptians pioneered the art of beer brewing and leavening bread at least 4,500 years ago. The ancient Chinese […]]]>

Analysis: Humans and Our Non-Human Ancestors Have Eat and Evolved Alongside Fermented Foods for a Long Time

Through John leech, Thégasc

How old is the art of fermentation and why should you be doing it too? The Egyptians pioneered the art of beer brewing and leavening bread at least 4,500 years ago. The ancient Chinese brewed mead 9,000 years ago, according to evidence found in clay pots unearthed in Jiahu, China. Although physical evidence from further afield is lacking, we can look to evolution for some insight into our long history with fermented foods.

Of shrews get drunk on fermented tree nectar and bees making bread To scavengers preserving their deceased dinners with yeast, research has proven that animals are no strangers to fermentation. However, humans and African apes are in a class of their own when it comes to fermented foods. As our common ancestor was fruit-eating, they would have encountered high levels of alcohol in some of the fruits they picked. We know that our ancestors evolved to consume fermented fruits because they possessed a keen sense of smell, sensitive to ethanol, which helped locate fallen fruits, and an enzyme 40 times more efficient at oxidizing ethanol than other animals.

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Excerpt from Culture File by RTÉ lyric fm, evangelist of the Irish fermentation movement, April Danann on West Cork wild yeasts

Given that our last common ancestor with African apes was over 10 million years ago, our common adaptations for fermented foods mean these traits are at least as old. The drunken monkey hypothesis (yes, that’s a real thing) suggests that it was our love for ethanol that drove our relationship with fermentation, and indeed some of our primate cousins ​​have shown a preferably 2-5% alcohol solutions based on water. At least three species of primates are known to cause ripe fruit to drop to the ground and return later to eat them, when the alcohol content is higher.

However, a new study suggests that pre-digestion of food through fermentation is what makes fermentation so important to us. As our ancestors left the trees and explored the savannahs, tuber fermentation opened up a whole new food resource, according to the study. Fermentation may have been so important that it, not the fire, that unlocked the extra nutrients we needed to increase our brain size.

Now that we know that humans (and our non-human ancestors) have been eating and evolving alongside fermented foods for a long time, how important are fermented foods in our everyday lives? He is valued that up to a third of all food consumed is fermented. This includes many products, such as coffee, chocolate, and alcoholic beverages.

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Extract from the cultural file of RTÉ Lyric FM, the guru of fermentation, Sandor Katz on teaching the world to stop worrying and loving the microbe

Let’s go back a bit. If we no longer need fermentation to access nutrients, why would these foods be important? Research over the past two decades has show that the microbiome is very important to human health. The microbiome is the collection of mainly microbes, bacteria, fungi and viruses that live on and in the human body.

Our own bodies contain many different microbial ecosystems, from our eyelids to our mouths, from our lungs to our gut. Each site has a unique community of microbes and performs important tasks for us. For example, the gut microbiome helps us digest our food, protect us from pathogens, and has been linked to a wide range of chronic diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Crohn’s disease, diabetes, cardiovascular health, obesity and depression. It is a very complex ecosystem and it is not easy to determine if, how or what causes disease in such a diverse ecosystem.

However, one pattern that has emerged in microbiome studies is that diversity is best. The more species there are in the gut microbiome, in general, the healthier an individual is. By studying large populations of people, many parts of the world, we see that populations living a hunter-gatherer lifestyle in non-industrialized regions of the world have higher microbial diversity than those of us living in the industrialized world.

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From RTÉ Brainstorm, a deep dive into the intestinal microbiome

In our world (Ireland), we disinfect everything. We pasteurize our food, we sterilize our homes, we take antibiotics when we are sick, and we eat processed foods. These changes have mostly saved lives, reducing our exposure to pathogens and making infectious diseases much less dangerous. However, it comes at a cost, and due to a relatively sterile environment, both our food and our living spaces, our industrialized microbiomes are not as diverse as our more traditional neighbors elsewhere on the planet. We also suffer from higher rates of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease, all of which have been linked to the gut microbiome.

So, are fermented foods important? In the context of the microbiome, the foods of most interest are those that contain live microbes when we eat them. Fermented foods are difficult to study for several reasons, largely due to the variable nature of their own microbiomes. However, the evidence from recent years is growing, with studies showing that certain foods such as yogurt, kimchi, sauerkraut and kefir have positive effects on certain diseases, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular health, obesity and depression.

In the context of the microbiome, the most interesting foods are those that contain live microbes when we eat them.

A study from the beginning of the year show for the first time that daily consumption of fermented foods (and a few servings per day as well) has increased the diversity of our microbiome while reducing inflammation status. Chronic inflammation is associated with a wide range of chronic diseases. Fermented foods provide daily exposure to billions of living microbes, microbes we no longer encounter due to our westernized environment.

More importantly, they are free from infectious disease risks, perhaps occupying the perfect position between traditional diversity and modern security while helping to reduce chronic disease. Much more research is needed, but the role of fermented foods in health is becoming clearer by the day.

Dr John Leech is a MASTER researcher at APC Microbiome Ireland SFI Research Center based at Thégasc


The opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not represent or reflect the views of RTÉ




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Fairfax Mountain Mac Cider Extends Roots in Middlebury | Food and drink characteristics | Seven days https://ringoffiremeadery.com/fairfax-mountain-mac-cider-extends-roots-in-middlebury-food-and-drink-characteristics-seven-days/ https://ringoffiremeadery.com/fairfax-mountain-mac-cider-extends-roots-in-middlebury-food-and-drink-characteristics-seven-days/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 18:58:31 +0000 https://ringoffiremeadery.com/fairfax-mountain-mac-cider-extends-roots-in-middlebury-food-and-drink-characteristics-seven-days/ Click to enlarge Caleb Kenna Mac mountain cider In the fall of 2016, when Conor McManus began experimenting with hard cider, his trial lots took over the 1850s Fairfax farm that he and his wife, Leah, had purchased earlier that year. McManus, now 42, was in construction management at the time. He was ready for […]]]>

Click to enlarge

  • Caleb Kenna
  • Mac mountain cider

In the fall of 2016, when Conor McManus began experimenting with hard cider, his trial lots took over the 1850s Fairfax farm that he and his wife, Leah, had purchased earlier that year.

McManus, now 42, was in construction management at the time. He was ready for a career change and planned to grow hops to feed the craft brewers’ voracious appetite for local ingredients. “I like being near trees and plants, being outside and working with my hands,” he said.

He had started growing hops while he and Leah lived in the Midwest, but his 35 potted vines did not survive the couple’s return to native New England. McManus noticed that his new property had some old apple trees. He started grinding apples in a blender and using a tabletop cider press to make sweet cider. “The kitchen was always a sticky mess,” he said regretfully.

McManus would pour the unpasteurized cider into clean containers and let the wild yeasts on the skin of the apples do their job: eating the sugar from the cider, producing the alcohol and carbon dioxide that turn the sweet cider into hard cider.

As his experiments developed, “I bought half-gallon growlers one box at a time. That’s all I could afford,” said McManus. The novice cider tried mixing different apples, fermenting at varying temperatures, and adding commercial lab-grown yeasts. “I burned three mixers,” he said. “I drove my wife crazy with a few hundred growlers all over the house.”

Countless growlers and five years later McManus shipped his first cans of Mac des Montagnes cider in June. With the support of the distribution of Vermont Craft Beer Guild, his cider is now sold in retail stores statewide. At the beginning of November, the first barrels land in a few restaurants and bars, including Ken’s Pizza and Pub in Burlington and the Fit for Vermont the group’s three restaurants: Worthy Burger in South Royalton, Worthy Burger Too in Waitsfield and Worthy Kitchen in Woodstock.

McManus is currently fermenting and canned under the Liquor Production License of Groennfell Meadery in St. Albans, but he is in the process of starting his own cider house at Middlebury’s Happy Valley Orchard by the end of the year. He is working with the owners, Stan and Mary Pratt, to finalize a deal that will eventually allow him to purchase the 17-acre orchard, retail store, and cider-making and storage facilities.

Stan Pratt, 68, took a break from making cider donuts on Oct. 29 to confirm negotiations with McManus. “I knew it had to be a hardworking person,” Pratt said. “It seems his ideas for the orchard and its future are what I imagine.”

While details are being worked out, McManus uses Pratts’ massive press this fall to process 500,000 pounds of fruit from a handful of orchards within a 100 mile radius, plus about 3,000 pounds. of fodder apples. The resulting sweet cider will grow to over 35,000 gallons of Mountain Mac hard cider, a seven-fold jump from the company’s first year of commercial production.

Such large-scale production is monumental for McManus, among the most recent of About two dozen Vermont hard cider makers – but a microscopic drop in the North American hard cider market. According to forecast market data, the industry is expected to grow by around 10% per year to around $ 4.7 billion by 2026, driven by continued strong demand for gluten-free and low-alcohol drinks.

Click to enlarge
Conor McManus with his Mountain Mac strong cider - CALEB KENNA

  • Caleb Kenna
  • Conor McManus with his Mountain Mac hard cider

Conor Giard, market manager for Craft Beer Guild, said the specialty drink distributor is constantly receiving arguments from new companies and taking relatively little of it. After a few sips of Mountain Mac, Giard said, McManus had his attention.

” There is a lot of [hard] cider out there that’s really sweet, but if you take out all the sweet, really dry ciders are really tart, ”Giard said. Mountain Mac “sits perfectly in the middle. I think that’s what most people want when they say they want dry cider. It’s just very good: drinkable but also complex and a little funky. ”

McManus also stood out as an individual. “It’s not often that people are as passionate and knowledgeable as he is,” Giard said. “He’s talking about grafting trees himself.”

McManus grew up in southern New Hampshire and both of his parents were foresters. “They taught me about trees,” he said, including how to graft live twigs from one apple tree to another to propagate promising varieties. His mother owns an orchard dating from the 1680s, from which he has obtained some grafts.

At Fairfax Farm, the couple have a menagerie of pigs, chickens, geese and goats. McManus grows 450 young apple trees and an acre and a half of raspberries, blackberries and black raspberries. The manure of the cattle feeds the berries and the orchard. The animals, in turn, relish apple pulp meals throughout the fall and winter.

More than a decade ago, McManus was working in the management of a huge construction company in a windowless cabin on the 18th floor of its headquarters in New Haven, Connecticut, when he realized that ‘he needed a radical change. “I just wanted to get out of the office,” he said.

But it took McManus several years to feel he could step away from a regular salary for the risks of entrepreneurship. “Rich, I guess, is just a prospect,” McManus said. “If you’re able to do something you love, being around people you love, doing something you want to do, that’s wealth in itself.”

McManus has funded the project so far with the couple’s savings. He estimates that in five years he spent about $ 250,000 on everything from hauling apples to boxes and labels. He has three presses and a canning line that he has never used.

When he informed Kelly and Ricky Klein of Groennfell Meadery of his intention to use the labor intensive manual line for his first cans, “They said, ‘No, no. You can’t do that, “” recalls McManus. He had befriended the Kleins at a small business conference. They offered to let him use their facility until he found one.

Last year, when the pandemic delayed Mountain Mac’s launch by seven months, cash flow was particularly tight. McManus had purchased apples from the fall harvest and was counting on income from November 2020 to pay for the orchards. “I didn’t finally have enough money to buy fuel oil for our house,” admitted McManus.

When challenges arise, McManus credits his 16 years in the Vermont Air National Guard – which he joined in college – to helping him keep things in perspective.

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Happy Valley Orchard in Middlebury, where apples are pressed for Mountain Mac cider - CALEB KENNA

  • Caleb Kenna
  • Happy Valley Orchard in Middlebury, where apples are pressed for Mountain Mac cider

In 2013, McManus was deployed to Afghanistan for a six-month tour as a civil engineer. “You see up close how difficult things can be and how lucky we are here…” he said. “There are all kinds of things we take for granted: a toothbrush, running water, fresh fruit.” He donates part of Mountain Mac’s income to a project that supports pet ownership for veterans.

McManus has learned a lot about making cider from his early days of sticky cooking. One of the first things he realized was that delicious, fresh-squeezed cider isn’t necessarily what makes good hard cider. Example: the first batch of sweet cider from the old trees on the farm. “Man, that was horrible, so bittersweet,” he recalls, “like that wild apple that you bite into and just want to spit out.”

But after fermenting for a winter, the resulting hard cider was delicious when McManus opened it during a snowstorm in February. “My friends said to me, ‘Do you have any more?’” He recalls.

“There were a lot of failures after that,” he added with a chuckle. “But luckily that first batch was amazing.”

It’s not easy to develop a method that produces a commercial cider with wild yeasts, like McManus does. “I do a lot of tastings to make it as consistent as possible,” he said. “But I absolutely announce that no lot is ever the same.”

For Mountain Mac’s flagship offering, the base cider is pressed from a combination of different apples. To this “mellow” cider, McManus said, he adds a dose of pressed cider from a proprietary blend of forage apples, which he called more “intense.” The blend achieves its goal of “somewhere between a dry cider and a semi-sweet cider with a lot of flavor complexity – dry but not super dry”.

In addition to the wild yeasts on apples, McManus uses a strain he cultivated, such as a hard cider version of a sourdough sourdough. “It took me several hundred batches to get one that I liked,” he said. Towards the end of a long traditional fermentation from October to May, he adds laboratory yeast to stabilize the cider.

Ricky Klein of Groennfell has judged international wine, beer, cider and mead competitions. He said he was impressed from the start with McManus’ approach and diligence.

“Conor is so focused on letting the wild yeast do its job and letting that distinguish his cider,” Klein said. “A well-fermented cider brings out the character of apples. A lot of people think the apple is the most important thing. It’s not the apple, it’s what you make of it.”


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Buzz Meadery finds the right place in Berlin https://ringoffiremeadery.com/buzz-meadery-finds-the-right-place-in-berlin/ https://ringoffiremeadery.com/buzz-meadery-finds-the-right-place-in-berlin/#respond Sun, 07 Nov 2021 14:07:23 +0000 https://ringoffiremeadery.com/buzz-meadery-finds-the-right-place-in-berlin/ BERLIN, Maryland (AP) – Brett and Meghan Hines, both full-time teachers at Indian River High School, opened The Buzz Meadery in Berlin during the COVID-19 pandemic. Brett Hines said they ended their lives before the pandemic hit, which left them with no choice but to open up. “I don’t think much would have changed if […]]]>

BERLIN, Maryland (AP) – Brett and Meghan Hines, both full-time teachers at Indian River High School, opened The Buzz Meadery in Berlin during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Brett Hines said they ended their lives before the pandemic hit, which left them with no choice but to open up.

“I don’t think much would have changed if the pandemic hadn’t happened,” he said. “It honestly gave us a chance to start slower and figure things out. “

When the couple lived in Colorado, Brett was a member of a group of amateur brewers called Liquid Poets.

“A guy at my homebrew club got me hooked on session mead. I started making it and really liked the taste and the brewing process was fun for me, ”Hines said.


Using fully ripe fruits and vegetables, they source from local producers on the east coast to create various meads and ciders.

Hines said they look for organic growers or transitional organic growers first when selecting who to buy fruits and vegetables from for meads or ciders.

“If that’s not an option, we try to partner with whoever is closest, who has the most sustainable practices,” he said. “It’s my way of making more eco-friendly alcohol that tastes amazing and is really fun to drink.”

The Buzz Meadery was launched in an 800 square foot building on Worcester Highway, where there was a brewing area and tasting room, which has since closed to the public.

He now serves meads and ciders from a van parked at the Berlin Commons. The donation-based community green space is located at 21 Jefferson St. in Berlin.

“We live here in town and it was a way to get our mead truck out, serve here on the weekends and bring our friends and family from the neighborhood to walk around town and enjoy sitting outside and really recreating a community, ”he said.

Hines said The Berlin Commons was a creative collaboration to have an outdoor outdoor space that is COVID-friendly and centered between residential and commercial neighborhoods.

“I think what the Commons really represents is community. I think everyone can just take a step back and remember that everyone is doing their best, ”he said.

The Buzz Meadery sells its products directly to the Berlin Commons from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Fridays and from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturdays.

Also in Berlin, Boxcar on Main and Sterling Tavern have Soulstice on tap while Blacksmith has bottles available.

West-O Bottle Shop & Bar in Ocean City, Pitt Stop Beer, Wine and Spirits in Berlin, and The Buzzed Word in Ocean City also offer Buzz Meadery products.


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WNY groups call for a ‘bigger and better bottle bill’ – Buffalo Rising https://ringoffiremeadery.com/wny-groups-call-for-a-bigger-and-better-bottle-bill-buffalo-rising/ https://ringoffiremeadery.com/wny-groups-call-for-a-bigger-and-better-bottle-bill-buffalo-rising/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 12:53:47 +0000 https://ringoffiremeadery.com/wny-groups-call-for-a-bigger-and-better-bottle-bill-buffalo-rising/ Niagara Square was the kick-off for a statewide event to call for a “bigger and better bottle bill”. A group of environmental and social justice organizations were brought together on Friday by the New York Public Interest Research Group (NYPIRG), calling on Governor Kathy Hochul to modernize the Returnable Container Act (commonly known as the […]]]>

Niagara Square was the kick-off for a statewide event to call for a “bigger and better bottle bill”. A group of environmental and social justice organizations were brought together on Friday by the New York Public Interest Research Group (NYPIRG), calling on Governor Kathy Hochul to modernize the Returnable Container Act (commonly known as the Bottle Bill) and to include it as part of its 2022-2023 executive budget.

NYPIRG spokesman Ryan Carson outlined the changes the coalition is calling for to the Bottle Bill. First, expand on the types and number of beverage containers covered by the bottle bill. Second, to increase the deposit to a dime.

Since 1982, the only major change in the New York Bottle Bill was in 2009, when guidelines were added to water bottles. Many new types of beverages have entered the market since 1982 and are currently exempt from the five-cent deposit, including sports drinks, teas, and bottled coffees. In addition, the original bill exempted non-carbonated drinks such as 100% juice drinks. The expansion of beverage types would also result in deposits for non-carbonated alcoholic beverages, such as wine, ciders, mead, and spirits.

A common refrain from speakers in Niagara Square is that the value of a nickel is not what it used to be. This can be seen in the steadily declining redemption rates, from a high of 80% in 1985 to the current rate of 64%. The call to increase the deposit complies with the recommendations of the Container Recycling Institute (CRI). Their studies show that a higher deposit equals a higher return rate.

The IRC can also draw on the experience of the State of Oregon to show the impact of an increase in the amount of the bond. Their first bottle bill in the country was enacted in 1971, and like New York, their return rate steadily dropped to 64% in 2016. In 2017 the deposit was increased to ten cents and in 2020 their return rate was 90%.

The call was for an expansion of the types of beverages included in the deposit program and to increase the deposit to partially accommodate 40 years of inflation.

Earlier this year, a bill similar to NYPIRG’s proposals to modernize the New York Bottle Bill passed with bipartisan support in Connecticut. In addition, the states bordering the Empire State act on their own proposals. There are calls in Massachusetts to improve their Bottle Bill, legislation has been introduced to extend the Bottle Bill to Vermont, and a proposal to start a deposit program in Pennsylvania was recently presented at the State House.

The effort to modernize the New York Bottle Bill is nothing new. Several proposals have been suggested in the past, most recently by Governor Cuomo in his 2019 State of the State address. There was also concurrent legislation that was proposed during the 2019 and 2020 legislative sessions that would have expanded the elements included in the bottle bill. At the time, it was vigorously opposed by the American Beverage Association (ABA), a group funded by companies like Coca-Cola and Pepsi.

But over the past couple of years, these companies and many others have made a commitment to using recycled content for their packaging, and the ABA now has an initiative to reclaim every bottle. There is no better way to return recyclables in a closed loop bottle to bottle system than a single flow collection system like the one we have with our bottle invoice. Returned containers are a dream source for recyclers. It is a source of clean material as the containers are already sorted into glass, aluminum and plastic, which reduces handling costs and makes recycled content (especially for plastic) more competitive compared to new virgin materials.

When an extension to the Bottle Law was proposed three years ago, Governor Cuomo noted that it “would help minimize waste, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and protect the environment.” for future generations ”. The Bottle Bill has been recognized as the most effective program we have in tackling roadside waste. It is time to modernize product law and the economy of the 2020s.


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That’s Colorado mead, honey! | TheFencePost.com https://ringoffiremeadery.com/thats-colorado-mead-honey-thefencepost-com/ https://ringoffiremeadery.com/thats-colorado-mead-honey-thefencepost-com/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 22:40:00 +0000 https://ringoffiremeadery.com/thats-colorado-mead-honey-thefencepost-com/ Just a few house beer lovers since the 1990s, Honnibrook Craft Meadery co-owners Michael Fagan and DJ Kurtz became friends in 2010 and began a business trip together which ultimately took the surprising path of opening a artisanal mead. This trip brought growth and rewards to their Castle Rock, Colorado based facility, including winning the […]]]>

Just a few house beer lovers since the 1990s, Honnibrook Craft Meadery co-owners Michael Fagan and DJ Kurtz became friends in 2010 and began a business trip together which ultimately took the surprising path of opening a artisanal mead. This trip brought growth and rewards to their Castle Rock, Colorado based facility, including winning the prestigious “Commercial Wine 2021 Best of Show” trophy at the Colorado State Fair for their Peach Habanero mead.

Officially open for business in February 2019, how did Honnibrook Craft Meadery manage to rack up the growth and rewards? Fagan and Kurtz attribute their unique approach to mead making to the use of premium Colorado honey from Lockhart Honey Farms.

Mead-loving patrons and even mead curious people regularly come in and out on a Friday night to an overflow tent set up right outside the large open door of the Honnibrook Craft Meadery warehouse in Castle Rock, Colorado. Honnibrook regularly reserves local food trucks to provide the food when the artisanal meadows open its doors to customers Thursday through Sunday. Gas fireplaces are set up between the tables when the fall nights start to get cooler. Photo by Lincoln Rogers

Mead brewers’ approach



While dedicated home brewers, the duo also enjoyed making mead on occasion. At different places they brought the two drinks, only to observe that “people were drinking beer, but they were lining up for mead.”

But it still took more to get them to make mead.



“We always wanted to brew beer, because beer was cool,” Kurtz said with a laugh as he and Fagan oversaw the machines that pumped and mixed a 55 gallon barrel of Colorado honey with filtered water from Castle Rock. According to the couple, writing a business plan was the tipping point.

“We looked at (our) business plan and needed $ 1.5-2 million,” Kurtz said of the costs of a craft brewery requiring outside investment. “We realized we were going to be employees. We weren’t going to own it.

“Do I really want to work long hours for someone else?” Chipped Fagan. “So we thought we were going to make mead, while keeping our beer roots.”

DJ Kurtz, co-owner of Honnibrook Craft Meadery in Castle Rock, Colo., Adds a proprietary blend of nutrients and yeast to the water as the honey pours into the vat at the start of a new batch of mead. According to Kurtz and co-owner Michael Fagan, their award-winning mead has differentiated itself over the past two years by approaching mead from a craft brewing perspective, versus the traditional winemaking perspective of most producers of wine. ‘mead. Photo by Lincoln Rogers

Keeping their beer roots meant approaching mead from a “light and refreshing” beer angle compared to the traditional heavier wine style of most 10-14% alcohol meads.

“It was probably about two and a half years of experimentation,” Fagan said of the makeup of their product while noting that Kurtz’s formal training as a culinary chef was vital to the process. “We were trying to get the mouth feel (and) the good taste,” continued Fagan. “We would take little torpedo barrels to barbecues in the backyard, and when people were like, ‘this is a really good beer,’ we knew we were there.”

Lockhart Honey Farms premium Colorado monofloral honey flows from a 55 gallon drum and into a tank to combine with water before a mixture of yeast and other nutrients are mixed into the Start of a new batch of artisanal mead from award-winning Honnibrook Craft Meadery in Castle Rock, Colorado. Mead recently beat many Colorado wineries and varietals to win the prestigious “Commercial Wine 2021 Best of Show” award at Colorado State Fair 2021. Photo by Lincoln Rogers

As a result, Honnibrook’s unique style of mead is a lighter alcohol content with a refined level of carbonation.

“Two and a half years of experimentation tells us that 6.2% (alcohol content) is the magic number,” Fagan said. “This is where we want him to be.”

Honnibrook’s growth resulted in Fagan and Kurtz making a new batch of mead every few weeks, instead of starting in 2019 by making batches every several months. In addition to finding their magic number of 6.2%, Fagan and Kurtz also credit Lockhart Honey Farms of Colorado for the growing popularity of their mead.

Honnibrook Craft Meadery co-owners DJ Kurtz and Michael Fagan stand among the equipment used to create a new batch of mead at their artisanal meadery in Castle Rock, Colorado. Fagan, right, is next to a 55 gallon drum of Lockhart Honey Farms’ Colorado honey that is pumped and mixed with water and other ingredients to be sent to the fermentation tanks for create their award-winning mead. Photo by Lincoln Rogers

“It’s a super rich monofloral honey,” said Fagan. “We get a super clean ferment and we get the same product all the time. We need consistency.

PREMIUM COLORADO HONEY

“This is what we bring to the table with our alfalfa honey, is that we place our bees next to large alfalfa fields and every year those fields will bloom,” Leo Lockhart said of the consistency of their monofloral honey. “When you put your bees around wildflowers and that sort of thing, you get a different balance of flowers, so each year the flavor can be very different. “

Leo and Laura Lockhart of Lockhart Honey Farms in 2020. Photo by Rebecca Elliot, Sunnybrook Photo

Second generation beekeeper, Léo takes care of the bees while his wife Laura manages the commercial part. He estimates that they have 1,200 to 1,300 beehives in Colorado, while his entire family has about 9,000 beehives in the state. While Leo and Laura also have beehives in Nebraska and move beehives across the country throughout the year, he thinks Colorado honey is the best.

“Colorado honey tastes so much better than the rest of the country,” Leo said. “I go to national conferences and always try the other honeys and have never found another that I would even put in the same stadium as Colorado.”

“The area we produce is in the Arkansas River Valley,” Laura said. “It has always been a very high quality product. It seems to be a rarer find (and) a rare taste. I’m just glad it’s something that works great for making mead that (Honnibrook) has had a lot of success with.

“We feel very lucky to have been bonded with them,” added Leo of the supply of honey casks to Honnibrook Craft Meadery. “Their mead is excellent. I think one of the reasons they do so well is their attention to quality and their ingredients.

AWARD-WINNING MEAD

This quality and care produced the aforementioned title of Best of Show Commercial Wine 2021 at the Colorado State Fair. While Kurtz and Fagan had already won Best of Show in the mead category there, the overall Best of Show took them by surprise.

A pair of happy customers from Castle Rock, Colorado – Garrett and Jessica Taylor – taste several flavors of Honnibrook Handmade Mead on a Friday evening in October 2021. Honnibrook serves tasters in smaller glasses and labels the flavors at comparison purposes. Photo by Lincoln Rogers

“These are grape wine judges who tell us our mead is better than the grape wines they’ve judged,” Kurtz said. “We won the Best of Show against the big guys. It is still difficult to understand. “

“Winning the best Colorado wine, ever in our wildest dreams,” said Fagan. “It’s just things we didn’t expect to happen to us.”

Honnibrook was also recently ranked # 1 in a list of “10 Best Wineries in Colorado” by ChoiceWineries.com. While the rewards are rewarding for Fagan and Kurtz, they love to make mead.

Honnibrook Craft Meadery co-owners Michael Fagan, left, and DJ Kurtz are proud of their “Commercial Wine 2021 Best of Show” award at the 2021 Colorado State Fair. The duo’s Peach Habenero mead has beaten wineries and wines from all over Colorado for the big win. Photo by Lincoln Rogers

“We always talk about (Honnibrook) as our happy place,” Fagan said as Kurtz nodded and smiled. “In our day jobs there is a lot of stress and there are a lot of unhappy people. When people come here, everyone is happy. They’re excited about it and we’re excited about it.

For Honnibrook Craft Meadery, the use of premium Colorado honey has led to sweet success.

For more information on the award-winning Honnibrook Craft Meadery, as well as Lockhart Honey Farms, you can find them online at https://www.honnibrook.com and https://lockharthoneyfarms.com.


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A beginner’s guide to mead, the drink shaking its “ye olde” image https://ringoffiremeadery.com/a-beginners-guide-to-mead-the-drink-shaking-its-ye-olde-image/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://ringoffiremeadery.com/a-beginners-guide-to-mead-the-drink-shaking-its-ye-olde-image/ Mead? Isn’t that what the Vikings drank? It was certainly popular in the Middle Ages and was the drink of choice for Danish warriors in the Old English epic poem Beowulf. But mead is much older than that, so much so that it is widely regarded as the very first alcoholic beverage, with evidence of […]]]>

Mead? Isn’t that what the Vikings drank?

It was certainly popular in the Middle Ages and was the drink of choice for Danish warriors in the Old English epic poem Beowulf. But mead is much older than that, so much so that it is widely regarded as the very first alcoholic beverage, with evidence of honey fermentation in China dating back to 7000 BC. Ancient civilizations elsewhere in Asia, as well as in Europe and Africa, subsequently developed their own versions.

How it’s made ?

Suitable for a drink with such a long history, there are countless iterations, but in its simplest form, mead is made from honey and water, fermented with yeast. In terms of ranking, it is a drink apart, not being brewed like a beer, nor a type of wine or spirits. It’s also simple enough to be done at home, edited by YouTube tutorials, if you like. But beware: although easy to do, it is difficult to perfect.

So who does it?

Modern mead makers include those in Bermondsey Gosnells of London, which offers a range of canned sparkling meads – Houblonné, Citra Sea, Hibiscus and Sour – as well as bottled meads. Superstition Meadery, Arizona, ages some of its meads in bourbon and wine casks, creating a wide range of flavor profiles. Meanwhile, in New York City, actor and entrepreneur Dylan Sprouse – passionate about mead since he was a teenager – co-founded All-wise meadery. He makes traditional meads, as well as varieties flavored with rose petals and oolong tea.

How should I drink it?

Mead can be served neat, chilled or at room temperature, depending on the type. Sparkling varieties are a great alternative to cider. The growing popularity of mead means that it is also increasingly used as a cocktail ingredient. Take, for example, the bride’s nectar from The cocktail trading company., in Shoreditch, east London, made with jasmine mead, calvados, yellow chartreuse and lemon juice.


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Uses of different types of honey https://ringoffiremeadery.com/uses-of-different-types-of-honey/ https://ringoffiremeadery.com/uses-of-different-types-of-honey/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 10:17:24 +0000 https://ringoffiremeadery.com/uses-of-different-types-of-honey/ Honey is the natural sweet substance secreted by bees from the nectar of flowers. It is one of the oldest and most used foods in the world. Honey is available in a variety of colors, flavors and consistencies. It has long been used as an ingredient in cooking, as a sweetener and as a preservative. […]]]>

Honey is the natural sweet substance secreted by bees from the nectar of flowers. It is one of the oldest and most used foods in the world. Honey is available in a variety of colors, flavors and consistencies. It has long been used as an ingredient in cooking, as a sweetener and as a preservative.

Alfalfa honey

This honey is produced by bees which have only visited the alfalfa flowers. It is one of the cheapest honeys available. It has a mild, slightly nutty flavor and a creamy, almost buttery consistency. It is very popular as table honey and is often mixed with other honeys to vary tastes. Plus, it’s great when making recipes that call for “raw” honey.

Finally, it makes a great addition to candy and baked goods. Beekeepers harvest honey from alfalfa by removing the comb from the frames where bees have stored it and storing it in large containers or “honey buckets”. The honey is then sent to a processing plant where it is heated to expel moisture, cooled, and packaged for retail sale.

Holly berry honey

It is very dark in color and has a rich and intense flavor similar to that of chestnut honey. Holly honey is produced by extracting honey from the combs of bee colonies that have only visited holly. This honey is very dark in color and has a rich and intense flavor similar to that of chestnut honey.

It has a high alcohol content (around 12%) which gives it its preservative properties. It is very stable and does not deteriorate as quickly as other honeys. In fact, it can remain unchanged for many years if stored properly. Holly honey is considered by many to be the best all-round honey because of its unique properties. It is sold under various brands such as “Holly Berry”, “Lilac Beauty”, “Holly Mead”, “Garnier” and “Bonne Marie”.

Manuka honey

Manuka honey

Also known as “kiwi honey,” this type of honey is produced by bees that have only visited the flowers of the manuka tree. It is the only type of honey that has received approval from the “New Zealand Government Department of Health” as “potentially therapeutic”.

Manuka honey is the most unstable type of honey because it continues to ferment even after being opened. Once opened, manuka honey should be consumed within three weeks. Due to its instability, manuka honey is not recommended for people with diabetes or other medical conditions that require them to regularly test their blood sugar. It has a very strong flavor and is sold under various brands such as “Pure Manuka”, “Leicester”, “Woods End” and “Guthrie’s.

Due to its strong flavor, manuka honey is generally not added to recipes, unless the recipe specifically calls for “raw” honey. It is mainly used as an additive in oral drugs and cosmetics.

Buckwheat honey

Also known as ‘queen bee’ honey, this type of honey comes from bees that only visit the flowers of the buckwheat plant. It is considered by many to be the best all-round honey due to its unique properties.

It is added to baked goods, tea, coffee, and other beverages, and it is sold in jars with a plastic “bee” on the label. Honey can be classified according to its pollen content. The lower the amount of pollen, the purer the honey.

Clover honey

Clover honey

Clover honey is often used as table honey because it lacks the strong flavor of some of the other honeys. However, many people like the milder flavor of clover honey better suited for cooking or baking.

Naturally colorless, it is often used in food and cooking as an alternative to white sugar. Honey can be classified according to its pollen content. The lower the amount of pollen, the purer the honey.

Conversely, some people claim that clover honey has a mild medicinal flavor that reduces coughs and colds.

Acacia honey

Also known as “healing” honey, this type of honey comes from the nectar collected by bees that only visit the flowers of the acacia tree. It is a very popular honey in Africa and Asia.

Because it is relatively inexpensive, it is often used as table honey or to sweeten teas and coffee. Acacia honey is sometimes mixed with manuka honey to improve its healing properties. It is often sold in capsule or liquid form because bees produce large amounts of this honey.

Healing Properties: Many people swear by the medicinal qualities of acacia honey. It is believed to contain more antioxidants than any other type of honey. It also contains a number of different vitamins and minerals.

For the same reason, it is often used to treat minor cuts and burns.

Sweet flavor: Because it has a lower sugar content than most honeys, it has a milder flavor. It is often used as an alternative to table sugar when making candies or pastries.

Heather honey

Heather honey

It is the most expensive honey in the world. It comes from Scotland where the heather honey is harvested by hand. The bees that produce this honey collect the nectar only from the flowers of the heather. The color of heather honey ranges from pale yellow to dark orange and reddish brown. It has a strong, sweet flavor and a slightly bitter aftertaste. Many people love the flavor of heather honey and use it to sweeten teas and coffee. It is also sometimes added to cooking and is often used as table honey.

Because heather honey has a higher sugar content than most honeys, it tends to have a very fine sediment at the bottom of the jar. This sediment will cloud the honey and give it a very unappetizing appearance.

Eucalyptus honey

Eucalyptus honey comes from Australia. Eucalyptus honey has many medicinal properties. It has a very strong and pungent flavor that looks a bit like an orange or a lemon. Many people who love the flavor of eucalyptus honey use it as table honey. It is also often used to flavor teas and coffees.

Golden Honey

Golden Honey

The 100% pure golden honey from coffee blossoms blooms as white as snow on the branches that bloom in spring. The coffee flowers give you a honey of amber yellow color, with a sweet taste, slightly dry. Especially when the honey is ripe as long as possible, it does not change color or taste.

One advantage that makes Golden Honey popular is that when you use Golden Honey to prepare drinks or dishes, it will increase the delight of drinks or dishes without losing flavor. characteristic taste. This comes from coffee flowers grown on cool, cool high hills.

Fruit tree honey

This type of honey comes from the flowers harvested by bees which feed only on fruit trees. The color of this honey ranges from pale yellow to dark orange and reddish brown. It has a milder flavor than acacia honey and a sweeter aftertaste. Because it has a lower sugar content than most honeys, fruit tree honey is often used to make candy and baking.

They are obtained from a number of different fruit trees. The nectar collected by the bees is then mixed with a small amount of their honey and stored in the hive. The mixture is left to ferment naturally.

Lavender honey

Lavender honey

The color of lavender honey ranges from pale yellow to pale greenish yellow. It has a sweet and pleasant flavor with a hint of sweetness. Because it has a higher sugar content than most honeys, it tends to have a very fine sediment at the bottom of the jar.

As I said, this sediment will cloud the honey and make it look unappealing. However, it doesn’t affect the quality of the honey as long as you don’t mind having unattractive looking honey in your jar.

Orange Blossom Honey

The color of this honey ranges from light amber to bright orange. It has a strong floral scent and a sweet taste. It is the most used honey in Asia. It is very popular for making tea and as table honey. In some countries, like China, it is used to make medicines. The main problem with this type of honey is that it tends to crystallize easily. Therefore, it should be stored in a cool, dark place away from direct sunlight.

And always shake the jar well before measuring out the honey because crystals will settle at the bottom.

Cherry blossom honey

It is a very rare honey that comes from the nectar of cherry blossoms. It has a deep reddish purple color and a strong and pleasant floral scent. It has a smooth flavor and a medium body. Cherry blossoms are located in the forests of China and Japan. It is one of the oldest honeys still produced.

Organic Honey:

Organic honey is honey that has been produced according to certain standards set by the country where it is produced. These standards relate to how honey is extracted from the hive, how it is transported to the processing facility and how it is stored after being processed. In general, organic honey tends to be slightly more expensive than conventional honey.

However, many people think the extra money they spend on organic honey is worth it because they know their honey has been produced in a way that protects the environment and keeps the honey as natural as possible. .

Faq:

What is the composition of honey?

Honey is mainly made up of fructose, water, enzymes, vitamins and minerals.

How toxic is honey?

Honey is not at all toxic. Honey has been used as a medicine for thousands of years.

How do bees make honey?

In a beehive, bees make honey by taking nectar and other ingredients from flowers and mixing them with enzymes from their own saliva. The bees then store the sweet mixture in wax honeycombs. Once the honey is done, the bees seal the honeycombs with wax.

Conclusion

Honey is a sweet substance produced by bees and it has many health benefits. This type of honey is different because it does not contain sugar and it has been processed through a carbon filter. It is used by many people as a diet food because it is very low in calories and does not cause an increase in blood sugar.

The benefits of honey are many and we hope this article will give you some information about this miracle food.


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Rishi’s alcohol budget: how much cheaper YOUR favorite drink will be https://ringoffiremeadery.com/rishis-alcohol-budget-how-much-cheaper-your-favorite-drink-will-be/ https://ringoffiremeadery.com/rishis-alcohol-budget-how-much-cheaper-your-favorite-drink-will-be/#respond Wed, 27 Oct 2021 15:30:00 +0000 https://ringoffiremeadery.com/rishis-alcohol-budget-how-much-cheaper-your-favorite-drink-will-be/ DRINKERS could see the price of their favorite drink drop after Rishi Sunak announced the biggest alcohol tax shake in a century. In his fall budget, the chancellor called the current alcohol tax system “irrational” and promised a major overhaul. 1 The prices of your favorite drinks could be lowered as part of a radical […]]]>

DRINKERS could see the price of their favorite drink drop after Rishi Sunak announced the biggest alcohol tax shake in a century.

In his fall budget, the chancellor called the current alcohol tax system “irrational” and promised a major overhaul.

1

The prices of your favorite drinks could be lowered as part of a radical overhaul of the alcohol tax

Under the current complicated system, there are 15 tax brackets on alcohol. But that will be reduced to just six.

Drinks will now be taxed according to their alcohol content.

It will end the so-called Girls Night Out tax, which subjects wine and sparkling wines to much higher tariff rates than beer.

The move will lead to a drop in the tax on an ABV rose of 10.5% from 23 pence per bottle.

Mr Sunak said the reforms were “gradual” and “very necessary” and would mark the biggest alcohol tax upheaval in decades.

The chancellor said the changes would be fairer and reflect the way people drink today.

However, thirsty punters may have to wait to get their hands on some cheap alcohol.

The changes won’t take effect until February 2023, and even then there’s no guarantee that stores and pubs will pass on the savings.

Here we take a look at how the ad will affect the price of your favorite drinks.

Which drink is getting cheaper?

Fizz fans are on the verge of the biggest price drop, with a whopping 87p set to release a bottle of Canti Prosecco.

Mr Sunak said that the consumption of sparkling wines like prosecco has doubled and is not stronger than still wines, and therefore should not be taxed differently.

“I am going to end the irrational 28% duty premium they are currently paying,” he added.

“Sparkling wines – wherever they are produced – will now pay the same duty as still wines of equivalent strength.”

The tax cut will reduce 64p on a bottle of Freixenet Prosecco (12% ABV) and the same amount on a bottle of English Chapel Down sparkling wine.

A bottle of Martini Asti (7.5% ABV) will drop by £ 1.07.

Cider and beer

For the first time, the tax on fruit cider and beer will be aligned.

This means a 20% reduction in the duty on draft fruit cider, which brings down the price of a pint by 13 pence.

Fruit cider only represented one in 1,000 ciders sold in 2005, but now accounts for one in four cider sales, the Chancellor said.

“But they can pay two or three times more duty than cider which is made with apples or pears. So I reduce the duty on them too,” he added.

The tax cut will lose 1 pence on a bottle of Kopparberg or Old Mout fruity cider when you buy a bottle in a store.

A pint of Kopparberg Strawberry and Lime would cost 13p less in a pub.

The duty rates for all draft beers and ciders will be reduced by 5%, which will reduce the price of a pint by 3p.

It’s the biggest cup of beer in 50 years, and the biggest cup of cider in a century.

With the weaker beer now in a new strip, the price of a 3.4% ABV pint will drop by 25p.

While there is no change in store prices, that means you’ll get a pint of Stella Artois, Guinness, Fosters, or Carling for 3p less in pubs.

A pint of Adnams Lighthouse would cost 25 pence less in a pub and 22 pence for a store-bought bottle.

Canned gin and liqueurs

Fans of a canned gin will see the price drop by 9p, as the new tax system will recognize the lower ABV of pre-mixed drinks.

A Gordon’s Pink Gin and Tonic will cost £ 1.80 per store bought 250ml can, or 9p.

A can of Jack Daniels and Cola will cost 12 pence less, Pimm’s No. 1 Cup and Lemonade 10 pence less, and a Malibu Pina Colada 9 pence less.

These figures relate to premixed boxes purchased in stores.

Those who like a Bailey’s after dinner will see the price of a bottle drop by 41 pence under the new rules.

Meanwhile, a bottle of Aperol Aperitivo will come down to 26p and Tia Maria to 48p.

Which drinks are more and more expensive?

The tax review, however, is not good news for all drinkers.

As the new system now directly links the price of alcohol to its concentration, the price of some products with higher ABV will increase.

A bottle of 7.5% ABV Frosty Jack Cider, for example, would pay 45p more in tax and the same for 7.5% ABC Ace Cider.

A can of 4.8% ABV Thatcher’s Gold cider would be subject to a penny more in duty.

Red wines, which tend to have a higher ABV than white or rosé wines, will also pay more duty.

A bottle of 13% ABV Hardy’s VR Merlot will pay 35p more in tax and 13.5% ABV Campo Viejo Rioja 47p more.

The price of sherry and port is also expected to rise under the revamped system.

A bottle of Port Taylor’s at 20% ABV would pay £ 1.09 more in tax and Harveys Sherry (17.5% ABV) 51p more.

How will the new system work?

Under the revamped tax system, the number of brackets for alcohol tax will drop from 15 to just six.

The tariff rates for draft beer and cider will be aligned, reducing the price of beer by 3 pence and fruit cider, which was previously subject to a much higher tax, by 13 pence.

The government has said it will introduce a new rate for low-alcohol drinks of less than 3.5% ABV to encourage the development of new products in the hope that it will encourage more responsible consumption.

There will be rates for products between 1.2% to 3.4% ABV, 3.5% to 8.4% ABV, 8.5% to 22% ABV and those above 22% ABV.

The Chancellor said tying the tax to the VBA was “common sense”.

All drinks stronger than 8.5% will pay the same rate of duty regardless of product type, putting stronger beers on a par with wine and spirits for the first time.

The reforms will take effect on February 1, 2023.

A helping hand for brewers

Small brewers should also take advantage of Small Brewers Relief to allow small businesses to diversify their product lines.

Finally, a boost to pubs will come in the form of a so-called Draft Relief.

The government will cut tariffs on draft beer and cider by 5%, which is expected to reduce the price of a pint by 3p.

MPs and publicans have long pleaded with Sunak to cut the so-called “barrel tax” amid fears that too many drinkers may close their doors.

Duty rates on beer, cider, wine and spirits will also be frozen for another year.

The move is expected to save consumers £ 3 billion over the next five years and bolster the struggling ad industry.

Here is the full list of how the drinks will be affected.

  • Stella Artois (4.6%): £ 3.80 a pint – 3p minus tax. No change in store
  • Guinness (4.2%): £ 4.20 a pint – 3 pence less tax. No change in store
  • Favorites (4%): £ 3.20 a pint – 3p minus tax. No change in store
  • Carling (4%): £ 3.70 a pint – 3p minus tax. No change in store
  • San Miguel (5%): £ 4 a pint – 3 pence less tax. No change in store
  • Adnams Lighthouse (3.4%): £ 3.50 a pint – 25 pence less. £ 1.25 per 500ml bottle in shos – 22p minus tax
  • Strongbow (4.5%): £ 3.50 a pint – 2p minus tax. 61p per 440ml can in store – 0.5p less tax
  • Magners (4.5%): £ 3.50 a pint – 2p minus tax. 75p per 440ml can in store – 0.5p less tax
  • Stowford Press (4.5%): £ 3.55 a pint – 2p minus tax. 75p per 440ml can in store – 0.5p less tax
  • Thatcher’s Gold (4.8%): £ 3.50 a pint – 0.2 pence less. 71p per 440ml can in stores – 1p plus tax
  • Frosty Jack’s (7.5%): £ 3.70 per 2.5L bottle in store – 45 pence more
  • Ace Cider (7.5%): £ 3.99 per 2.5L in stores – 45p plus tax
  • Strongbow Dark Fruits (4%): £ 3.70 a pint – 13p minus tax. £ 1 per 440ml can in store – 1p minus tax
  • Strawberry and Kopparberg Lime (4%): £ 3.80 a pint – 13 pence minus tax. £ 1.65 per 500ml bottle in store – 1p minus tax
  • Kopparberg Mixed Fruit (4%): £ 3.80 a pint – 13 pence minus tax. £ 1.65 per 500ml bottle in store – 1p minus tax
  • Thatcher’s Cloudy Lemon Cider (4%) – £ 1.40 per 440ml can in stores – 1p less tax
  • Bulmer’s Red Berries and Lime (4%) – £ 1.30 per 500ml bottle in store – 1p less tax
  • Old Mount Kiwi and Lime (4%) – £ 1.65 per 500ml bottle in stores – 1p less tax
  • JP Chenet Sauvignon Blanc (11%) – £ 9 per bottle of 75CL in store – 12p HT
  • Porta 6 Vinho Verde (9.5%): £ 9 per 75cl bottle in store – 47p minus tax.
  • Hardy’s VR Merlot (13%): £ 7 per 75cl bottle in store – 35p plus tax
  • Campo Viejo Rioja Gran Reserva (13.5%): £ 16 per 75 cl bottle in store – 47p plus tax
  • Echo Falls Zinfandel (10.5%): £ 6.50 per 75cl bottle in store – 23 pence less
  • Blossom Hill Rose (11%): £ 8 per 75cl bottle in store – 12p minus tax
  • Plaza Centro Prosecco (11%): £ 7 per 75cl bottle in store – 87p less tax
  • Canti Prosecco (11%): £ 8.50 per 75cl bottle in store – 64p per less tax
  • Martin Asti (7.5%): £ 7.50 per 75cl bottle in store – £ 1.07 minus tax
  • Chapel Down English Sparking Wine (12%) – £ 18 per 74 CL bottle in store – 64 p less tax
  • Gospel Green Sparking Cyder (8.4%): £ 13.50 per 75cl bottle in store – 89p minus tax
  • Buckfast (15%): £ 8.50 per 75cl bottle in store – 81p plus tax
  • Harveys Sherry (17.5%): £ 12 per 75cl bottle in store – 51p plus tax
  • Croft Sherry (17.5%): £ 12 per 75cl bottle in store – 51p plus tax
  • Taylor’s Port (20%): £ 15 per 75cl bottle in store – £ 1.09 plus tax
  • Cockburn’s Port (20%): £ 12 per 75 cl bottle in store £ 1.09 plus tax
  • Blandy’s Duke of Clarence Madeira (19%): £ 12 per 75cl bottle in store – 86p plus tax
  • Smirnoff Vodka (40%): no change
  • Famous Grouse Whiskey (40%): no change
  • Gordon’s Pink Gin and Tonic (5%): £ 1.80 per 250ml can in store – 9p minus tax
  • Jack Daniels and Cola: £ 2 per 330ml can in store – 12p minus tax
  • Pimm’s No.1 Cup and Lemonade (5.4%): £ 1.80 per 250ml can in store – 10p less tax
  • Malibu Pina colada (5%): £ 1.60 per 250ml can in store – 9p minus tax
  • Bailey’s Irish Cream (17%): 17 per bottle of 70CL in store 41p less taxes
  • Coconut Malibu White Run: £ 15 per 70cl bottle in store – 50p less tax
  • Aperol Aperitivo (11%): £ 15 per bottle of 70CL in store – 26p less taxes
  • Kahlua coffee liqueur (16%): £ 15.50 per 70cl bottle in store – 38p less tax
  • Edinburgh Gin Rhubarb and Ginger (20%): £ 16.50 per 50cl bottle in store – 34p less tax
  • Tia Maria (20%): £ 15 per 70 cl bottle in store – 48p minus tax
A major boost for struggling pubs as business rates DRY, giving hope to UK drinkers

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